184_notes:b_shapes

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184_notes:b_shapes [2021/06/16 15:23]
bartonmo [Coils]
184_notes:b_shapes [2021/06/16 15:24] (current)
bartonmo
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 Thus far, we have primarily been talking about the magnetic field from a current in a long, straight wire. However, there are many shapes of wire in the real world that do not correspond to straight wires. Particularly relevant to this class will be a coil of wire and something we will call a solenoid. These notes go more into detail about what coils and solenoids are, and what the magnetic field looks like from both coils and solenoids. Thus far, we have primarily been talking about the magnetic field from a current in a long, straight wire. However, there are many shapes of wire in the real world that do not correspond to straight wires. Particularly relevant to this class will be a coil of wire and something we will call a solenoid. These notes go more into detail about what coils and solenoids are, and what the magnetic field looks like from both coils and solenoids.
  
-==== Coils ====+===== Coils =====
 [{{  184_notes:coil_current.png?200|Current in a coil of wire}}] [{{  184_notes:coil_current.png?200|Current in a coil of wire}}]
 A coil is when a length of wire with current running through it has been wrapped around on itself creating some sort of shape as shown in the figure to the right. (You may also hear a coil referred to as a "current-carrying coil", "a loop", or "a ring".) Typically, we will use circular coils because the mathematical calculations are easier for a circular coil, but you could also have a rectangular coil or some other shape. In these notes, we will focus on how to deal with the circular part of the wire, as we have already talked about how to [[184_notes:b_current|calculate the magnetic field from current in a straight wire]]. A coil is when a length of wire with current running through it has been wrapped around on itself creating some sort of shape as shown in the figure to the right. (You may also hear a coil referred to as a "current-carrying coil", "a loop", or "a ring".) Typically, we will use circular coils because the mathematical calculations are easier for a circular coil, but you could also have a rectangular coil or some other shape. In these notes, we will focus on how to deal with the circular part of the wire, as we have already talked about how to [[184_notes:b_current|calculate the magnetic field from current in a straight wire]].
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 [{{184_notes:bars_and_coils.png?500|Magnetic field vectors around a coil of wire is very similar to those of a permanent magnet  }}] [{{184_notes:bars_and_coils.png?500|Magnetic field vectors around a coil of wire is very similar to those of a permanent magnet  }}]
  
-==== Solenoid ====+===== Solenoids =====
 [{{  184_notes:10b_solenoid_notes.png?300|Magnetic field in and around a solenoid with current $I$ }}] [{{  184_notes:10b_solenoid_notes.png?300|Magnetic field in and around a solenoid with current $I$ }}]
  
  • 184_notes/b_shapes.txt
  • Last modified: 2021/06/16 15:24
  • by bartonmo