184_notes:q_enc

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
Next revision
Previous revision
184_notes:q_enc [2018/07/24 11:17]
curdemma [Charge Density and Charge]
184_notes:q_enc [2021/06/03 20:34] (current)
schram45
Line 1: Line 1:
 Section 21.1 from Matter and Interactions (4th edition) Section 21.1 from Matter and Interactions (4th edition)
  
-[[184_notes:gauss_ex|Next Page: Putting together Gauss's Law]]+/*[[184_notes:gauss_ex|Next Page: Putting together Gauss's Law]]
  
-[[184_notes:eflux_curved|Previous Page: Electric Flux through a Curved Surface]]+[[184_notes:eflux_curved|Previous Page: Electric Flux through a Curved Surface]]*/
  
 ===== Enclosed Charge ===== ===== Enclosed Charge =====
Line 34: Line 34:
 === Spheres of Charge === === Spheres of Charge ===
  
-{{184_notes:electricflux8.jpg?350}}+[{{184_notes:electricflux8.jpg?350|Spherical guassian surface around a sphere of charge}}]
  
 For a sphere of charge, (much like a point charge), the electric field vectors point radially away (for positive charge) or radially toward (for negative charge) the sphere. Since the electric field vectors point radially, we would want to choose a sphere as a Gaussian surface to enclose the charge because the $\vec{dA}$'s at every point along the sphere would also point radially outward. Choosing a sphere as the Gaussian surface then means that the electric field vector and the dA vector are always parallel or antiparallel, which helps us simplify the electric flux integral. For a sphere of charge, (much like a point charge), the electric field vectors point radially away (for positive charge) or radially toward (for negative charge) the sphere. Since the electric field vectors point radially, we would want to choose a sphere as a Gaussian surface to enclose the charge because the $\vec{dA}$'s at every point along the sphere would also point radially outward. Choosing a sphere as the Gaussian surface then means that the electric field vector and the dA vector are always parallel or antiparallel, which helps us simplify the electric flux integral.
Line 40: Line 40:
 === Lines or Cylinders of Charge ===  === Lines or Cylinders of Charge === 
  
-{{184_notes:electricflux9.jpg?350}}+[{{184_notes:electricflux9.jpg?350|Cylindrical guassian surface around a line or cyliner of charge}}]
  
 In the middle of a line (1D) or cylinder of charge (3D), the electric field vectors point radially away from a line of positive charge or radially toward a line of negative charge. If we make the line extremely long or zoom in to focus on a very small portion of the line/cylinder near the middle, the electric field vectors will point perpendicular to the surface. When dealing with lines or cylinders, we will often ignore the electric field near the ends because in that case the field vectors are not constant in magnitude or direction (which is much harder to deal with mathematically). Thus, we will often //__assume that the line/cylinder is extremely (or infinitely) long or that we only care about the middle section where the electric field is constant__// In the middle of a line (1D) or cylinder of charge (3D), the electric field vectors point radially away from a line of positive charge or radially toward a line of negative charge. If we make the line extremely long or zoom in to focus on a very small portion of the line/cylinder near the middle, the electric field vectors will point perpendicular to the surface. When dealing with lines or cylinders, we will often ignore the electric field near the ends because in that case the field vectors are not constant in magnitude or direction (which is much harder to deal with mathematically). Thus, we will often //__assume that the line/cylinder is extremely (or infinitely) long or that we only care about the middle section where the electric field is constant__//
Line 48: Line 48:
 === Sheets of charge === === Sheets of charge ===
  
-{{184_notes:planecharge.jpg?350}}+[{{184_notes:planecharge.jpg?350|Rectangular prism around a plate of charge}}]
  
 Similar to the lines of charge, the electric field for a positive plate of charge points perpendicularly away (and perpendicularly toward the plate for negative charge) in the middle of the plate. Near the edges of the plate (similar to the line of charge) the electric field vectors change directions and magnitudes, making it much harder calculate. Typically, we will make //__the assumption that the charged plate is very large (or infinite) or that we only care about the field close to the center of the plate away from the edges__//    Similar to the lines of charge, the electric field for a positive plate of charge points perpendicularly away (and perpendicularly toward the plate for negative charge) in the middle of the plate. Near the edges of the plate (similar to the line of charge) the electric field vectors change directions and magnitudes, making it much harder calculate. Typically, we will make //__the assumption that the charged plate is very large (or infinite) or that we only care about the field close to the center of the plate away from the edges__//   
  
-If we wanted to find the electric field from a large plate of charge, then we would want to choose a (smaller) cylinder or rectangular prism as the Gaussian surface around the plate of charge because the electric field vectors would then point parallel to the dA vectors through the top and bottom surfaces.+If we wanted to find the electric field from a large plate of charge, then we would want to choose a (smaller) cylinder or rectangular prism as the Gaussian surface around the plate of charge because the electric field vectors would then point parallel to the $dAvectors through the top and bottom surfaces.
  
 ==== Examples ==== ==== Examples ====
-[[:184_notes:examples:Week5_flux_cylinder_line|Flux through a Cylinder on a Line of Charge]]+  *[[:184_notes:examples:Week5_flux_cylinder_line|Flux through a Cylinder on a Line of Charge]] 
 +    * Video Example: Flux through a Cylinder on a Line of Charge 
 +{{youtube>AuO9X310GTs?large}}
  • 184_notes/q_enc.1532445475.txt.gz
  • Last modified: 2018/07/24 11:17
  • by curdemma